New Stadiums Lean Heavily on Precast Concrete

Every year, millions of Americans enjoy sporting events held at massive stadiums across the country. Whether the sport is football, baseball, basketball, or hockey, these stadiums are oftentimes not just a place to hold the game but works of art themselves. They are also modern architectural marvels, as the sheer magnitude of the stadiums coupled with the state-of-the-art features makes them seem like something out of a science-fiction novel. Take for instance Cardinals Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals football team. The stadium itself is made of precast concrete, metal, glass, and all sorts of other building materials, but the really amazing part is the roll-out playing field. That’s right-the grass field itself can actually roll entirely out of the stadium on what is called the field tray. The flexibility of completely rolling this natural grass out of the stadium allows the football team to have a grass playing surface while allowing the stadium the ability to house other events like conventions, basketball games, or concerts. When you’ve just built a costly stadium, this multi-purposing can help you get a return on your investment much faster.

No matter what type of stadium is being built, you can bet it is a dream for a precast concrete manufacturer. With all of the sewage pipes that a stadium needs, the concrete needs are certainly through the roof. And if a stadium necessitates new roads and infrastructure, that can certainly mean a lot of concrete as well. There is also simply the stadium structure itself. Many times interior and exterior walls are created using large slabs of concrete. In many cases, the concrete is precast, allowing for nice, smooth surfaces that can be painted using the team’s colors. The durability is also first-rate, which is especially important in cold-weather environments. And the longer a stadium can last, the easier it is to make money on it.

What sometimes isn’t taken into account with a new stadium is the concrete needs of the area around the stadium. It’s not uncommon to see a box culvert or two being used to divert water from where it’s not wanted. Concrete walkways allow foot traffic to flow over expressways and around natural obstacles. And the amount of concrete parking ramps that a new stadium can support is many. When you take it all together, it’s easy to see that stadiums are not just about housing a great sports team, they’re also about a lot of concrete. It may not be the most glamorous aspect of pro sports, but it’s something different to think about the next time you sit in front of the television to watch the big game.